Tattling Vs. Reporting Freebie

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This FREE download from my Teachers pay Teachers store will help your students think about the difference between tattling and telling.  This is a great addition to any lesson about tattling that you may do with your students.  (If you downloaded the one with the type-o, it has been corrected!)

FREE Tattling Vs. Reporting Download (Type-O Corrected!)

I have also added a new end-of-year school memories paper folding activity.  It sells for $2.00, but will be on sale today  for $1.50.  Additionally, my Character Trait Paper Folding COMBO PACK will be a dollar off as well.  It sells for $4.00, but is marked $3.00 today only.

Character Trait Paper Folding Activities COMBO PACK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This sale will end tonight, April 14, at 10PM EST.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.

I’m still waiting to hear from two winners of the Social Skill Builder App Giveaway.  Emails went out Saturday morning, and the deadline to respond is Monday, April 15 at 7PM EST at which point new winners will be selected as per the Terms and Conditions.

 


Tough!- A Bully’s Perspective

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Weird Series- Tough!- Activity Sheet included-  savvyschoolcounselor.comI have thoroughly enjoyed presenting The Weird Series by Erin Frankel during my school counseling lessons with my fourth grade friends.  I wrote previously about the book Weird! which tells the story from the perspective of a victim and Dare! which told the story from the perspective of a bystander.  Last, but not least, is Tough!  Of course, this book comes from the bully’s point of view. My students were hooked after the first book.  They were all ears during the second lesson and were very excited to hear the last book of the series.  The students have enjoyed discovering similarities between the books.  Each had a signature symbol- from polka dots, to stars, and now hearts- which helped drive home a similar message:  Know Yourself. Be Yourself. Sam is the main character in Tough!  Readers get a peek into Sam’s world at the beginning of the book as the author reminds us of situations and comments she’s made to Luisa and Jayla from the previous two books.  As Sam tells the story, we see her brother calling her names and taking her guitar away from her.  It appears Sam has had her share of being picked on, and it turns out she stays “tough” in order to keep others from bothering her.  Her teacher, Mr. C, reaches out to her, and she soon decides to accept his help.  Just as we’ve hoped, Sam begins to listen to her heart and takes a turn for the better by the conclusion of the book. All three girls have a club at the end of each book.  Sam has the Kindness Club.  Her activities include a great reflection activity suggested to her by her teacher Mr. C called “Picture This.”  This activity allows her to write her thoughts on paper in order to help her see how her actions affect those around her.  After dividing a piece of paper into four equal sections, she labels the sections with four questions:

  • What did I do?
  • What did I hope to get by doing it?
  • What happened when I did it?
  • How can I get what I want without hurting others?

She then draws pictures to go along with each of the questions. Using this idea, I created an activity sheet called “Picture This” with four equal sections.  Each section has a question at the top and space underneath for students to either draw and/or write their answers.  During the lesson, the students can complete the sheet using Sam’s story OR they may refer to one of their own situations.  It’s also a good idea to give a blank copy to the classroom teacher to use as he or she sees fit in the future. Click the picture below to print a copy of the activity sheet.

"Picture This"- Activity Sheet to support the book Tough! by Erin Frankel- savvyschoolcounselor.com

  The Weird Series is one worth having on your counseling book shelf!  Thanks to Roxanne, from Books That Heal Kids, for bringing this series to my attention on her blog last summer. Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  As always, I’d love to hear from you. Be sure to let me know how your lessons go along with any new ideas you decide to add.


Dare!- A Bystander’s Perspective

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Dare! (The Weird Series)- savvyschoolcounselor.comIn a previous post, Weird!- A Bulling Victim’s Perspective,  I wrote about one book from The Weird Series by Erin Frankel.  The book Weird! is written from the perspective of the victim in a bullying situation.  Today, I’ll be focusing on the second book in the series: Dare! This book is written from the bystander’s point of view.  Like before, this school counseling lesson was used with my fourth grade friends.

One thing I really love about the series is the parallel story line.  The main character, Jayla, is often seen standing nearby in the first book.  In Dare!, we are given the opportunity to learn more about what Jayla was really thinking when she saw and heard Sam bullying Louisa.  We even discover that Jayla was so scared that when Sam “dared” her to say or do mean things to Louisa- she would.  She doesn’t like feeling used and thinks about some of the things she wants to say to Sam.  Readers are reminded of different episodes in the first book, but this time they’re from Jayla’s perspective.  She soon realizes that doing nothing is unfair to Louisa and to herself.  She decides to make her own “dare” by standing up for Louisa even though she is scared.  She prepared herself with responses to give just in case Sam lashed out at her for saying how she really felt.

When Louisa went back to being herself, she acted like she didn’t care if Sam called her weird.  Jayla acted like she wasn’t scared along with some other bystanders.  Like Louisa, she noticed that Sam began to leave her alone.

Like the first book, Dare! has notes from the main character after the story.  Jayla has the Courage Club.  Her activities include a discussion of feelings.  Jayla felt bad when she just stood by and did nothing.  For this activity, the students think of words other than “bad” to describe how they might feel in a bullying situation.  There are a few sentences for students to complete with another word for bad.  Jayla felt good when she finally stood up for Louisa.  Students now think of words other than “good” to fill the blanks in a few sentences.  There is also a brief reminder about the difference between telling and tattling.  I used these activities for our discussion after reading the book.

The Courage Club also includes a discussion about being prepared to stick up for someone who is being bullied.  I created this activity sheet to use with my fourth graders to close out the lesson.  In order to be prepared, the students wrote statements they can make or actions they can take when they see or hear someone being bullied.  The students were able to share their ideas with their classmates before we concluded the lesson.

Click the picture below to print a copy of the activity sheet.

Activity for Erin Frankel's book Dare! created by SavvySchoolCounselor.com

Louisa had her polka dots which represented being who you are- Never lose your polka dots.   In Dare!, Jayla has stars.  The author reminds students- “…your brightest star shines from within.”  Hmmm, I see hearts on Sam’s shirt at the end of this book…  Tune in later for a post about the book Tough! to learn more!

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates! As always, I’d love to hear from you.  I am really loving this series, and I hope you will too!


Weird!- A Bullying Victim’s Perspective

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My major focus in my school counseling program this school year has been on bullying.  I have had extensive conversations with my fourth and fifth grade friends especially.

This month, I’m using the book Weird! from the Weird Series with my fourth graders. This series is written by Erin Frankel.  Weird! is one of three books in the series which focuses on the victim’s perspective.  The other books, Dare! and Tough! focus on the bystander’s and bully’s viewpoints respectively.  Each book includes notes from the main character along with activities and reflection questions.

Weird! is about a girl named Luisa.  Sam, from the Tough! book, says everything Luisa does is “weird.”  Luisa goes on to give several examples of the things Sam considers “weird.”  This affects her so much, she begins to change and stops being herself.  She stops telling funny jokes and decides to stop wearing her favorite polka dot boots. If you look closely at the pictures, you’ll notice Jayla from the Dare! book.  She doesn’t like how Sam treats Luisa.  Soon, Luisa decides she must change her way of thinking.  She went back to being herself no matter what Sam said about her, and she acted like she didn’t care.  She soon noticed that Sam began to leave her alone.

I decided to use the activity “Recycle Your Thoughts” from Luisa’s Confidence Club at the end of the book.  Students cut out eight circles, or polka dots.  I  pre-cut several colorful circles from construction paper and made plain, white dots on regular paper.  On four of the dots, students may write some of Luisa’s negative thoughts or some of their own.  I made the white dots for this purpose.  On the other four colorful dots, the students change their negative thoughts into positive ones.  They may also decorate them.

 

I like that this activity has the students crinkle up the negative dots and symbolically toss them into the recycling bin.  They may then keep their positive dots to decorate a notebook or to hang on the wall in their bedrooms.  They can also tape these dots to their bathroom mirror where they can read these positive affirmations each day.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  As always, I’d love to hear from you!  Have you used the Weird Series in your school counseling program?  What activities for this book have you used with your students?


Kindergarten: Feelings and Responsibility

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One thing I really look forward to each year in my school counseling program is my very first visit with my new Kindergarten friends.  After seeing grades 1-5 over the last three weeks, it’s finally time to share my first lesson with Kindergarten.  I usually schedule them last intentionally.  I do this as to not disrupt the teachers’ firsts days with them.  They have so many new things to learn including classroom procedures.  Usually by the time I visit, they are ready to sit on the carpet crisscross applesauce with hands in their fish bowls and listening ears.

I had the opportunity to assist with the Kindergarten assessments, so I worked with most of them one-to-one during their staggered entry days.  So, many of them are already waving and saying hello when they see me.

I have thirty minutes to complete this lesson. The first part of my lesson includes my “A Counselor is…” cards I wrote about in a previous post.  These cards are great for explaining what a school counselor does.  As mentioned in my other post, the students learn that a counselor is a friend, a helper, a listener, a problem solver, and a secret keeper.  I make sure to stress that I can keep any secret as long is no one is being hurt.

Next, I introduce my Jellybean Friend Eugene, the emotional blue jellybean from Jellybean Jamboree.  This leads us to a discussion about feelings.  You can read more about Eugene and the other jellybeans here.  I read The Feelings Book by Todd Parr to Eugene and the class.  It is a great book which showcases many different feelings including some silly ones like “Sometimes I feel like eating pizza for breakfast” or “Sometimes I feel like kissing a sea lion.”  This year, I also have Todd Parr’s “Feeling Flashcards” which I am so excited about using.  For the purpose of this lesson, I will share the flashcards for happy, sad, angry, and scared as I discuss the different feelings Eugene has experienced.  I’ve decided to use the majority of the cards during Lunch Bunch and other small groups.  I will also use some cards here and there throughout the school year during future lessons.

Finally, I talk about all of the BIG words they’ll be learning about throughout the school year called character traits.  I share the first trait, responsibility, which is on their very first scoop of ice cream.  I mentioned my ice cream cone and scoops incentive  in the post They All Scream for Ice Cream.  I make a big deal about how big the word is, and we count the 14 letters.  (Then I make a big deal about how they can count to 14!)  I explain what it means to be responsible by sharing the book You Can Count On Me.  This is one of the character songs I sing with my kindergarten friends throughout the school year.  The words in the book are the words to the song.  After sharing it and having them repeat the chorus, we sing along with the CD and give ourselves a “round of applause” by clapping around in a circle.  If time allows, we will usually sing it two times.

To close, I review all the things we talked about during our lesson and add their very first ice cream scoop to their cone.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  As always, I’d love to hear from you.  What special activities do you use with your Kindergarten students during your first visit?


The 3 Learning Styles

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This week, I am working with my fourth grade friends for the first time this school year.  Over the years, I have incorporated the learning styles into individual school counseling and in my small groups for academic advisement.  This year, I decided to introduce the learning styles to my fourth graders in order to get them thinking now about how they learn best.  I worked with my first class today, and it went very well.

Knowing that all students learn differently, I thought fourth grade would be a good age to introduce learning styles and to help students understand why knowing their preferred learning style(s) can be beneficial to them.  The students seemed very interested during our discussion today.  It was nice to see some of them react when they connected with one of the learning styles as we discussed them.

I decided to create a basic three-flap foldable.  As usual, I made sure my lesson targeted each of the learning styles as well.  This is the same group of students I created the Test Taking Foldable for last year.  I explained that I wanted their new foldable to be another in which they could refer to as necessary.

I gave them a 9×11 sheet of manilla paper.  They folded the paper in half and divided the cover into three equal sections by drawing two lines.  Some simply cut across twice to make the three sections without drawing the lines.  While students were cutting, those who were ready were instructed to draw a hand on the first flap, an ear on the second flap, and an eye on the third flap.  Once everyone got to this point, we were ready to begin our discussion about the three learning styles.  I began my discussion by connecting the three pictures to how we learn.  Using the document camera, I displayed my sample foldable so they could label each flap.  I included two words for each picture: “Doing” for Kinesthetic, “Listening” for Auditory, and “Looking” for Visual. I used both words as I described each learning style.

Behind each flap, the students wrote the meaning of each learning style.  I used the meanings from an activity sheet from Diane Senn’s book Spectacular Guidance Activities called “Which Way Do I Learn?”  These were already written behind each flap on my sample, so I opened each flap one at a time so they could transfer the the meanings onto their foldables.

On the right side, the students wrote the tips I shared for each learning style.  I continued to refer to the “Which Way Do I Learn?” sheet as well as another chart from the book Academic Advisement Program.  We talked about several tips and how they can be used to help students study and learn throughout the school year.  I also talked about how their teacher creates lessons with these learning styles in mind.  Near the end, I asked student volunteers to tell the class how I incorporated the three learning styles into my lesson.  I shared that I am more of a visual learner and talked about the things I do that help me.  I even shared my “Which Way Do I Learn?” sheet in which I used three different colors to highlight the three learning style examples on my sheet to use during my discussion.  The students were able to see that as a visual learner, the colors were helpful for me as I taught the lesson.

I’m looking forward to visiting the remaining four classes to do this lesson.

You can find a template for this activity and a Learning Styles Cube Game in my TpT store.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  As always, I’d love to hear from you.  How do you teach your students about the 3 learning styles?