Savvy Guest Blogger: Student Bullying Report Form

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Savvy Guest BloggerI am excited to welcome Laura Smestad from The School Counselor Life Blog as a Savvy Guest Blogger today. I’m sure you will find this post useful.

Bullying is a buzzword among parents, students and teachers today. While awareness of bullying is a good thing, quite often it is confused with normal peer conflict, leaving us as counselors to educate others on what is bullying and what is not.

My students are able to differentiate between bullying and meanness quickly and soundly when I am presenting a lesson on the subject; however, once they are involved in a peer conflict situation that hurts their feelings, they seem to forget the differences. As a result, I created a Student Bullying Report Form that I use with any student who comes to me with a bullying claim.

I guide the student through the form as a way to gather more information (and to assess if it is truly a bullying situation I am dealing with), but the main purpose of this form for me is to help the students understand if they are talking about bullying or peer conflict.

The student completing the form writes his or her name, the name of the alleged bully, examples of the bullying behavior, and locations where that behavior takes place (I help my younger students write when needed).

Student Bullying Report

Then, there are a series of questions to which the student must answer yes or no. These are the questions:
1. Has this happened more than once? (If yes, how often? ____)
2. Are you friends with this person?
3. Do you often choose to be around this person?
4. Do you believe this person has more power than you? (If yes, how? _______)
5. Bullying is defined as “unwanted aggressive behavior that is repeated over time and involves an imbalance in power.” Based on this definition, do you believe the student you named is truly bullying you?

After the student is finished completing the form, we talk about the answers. Many times, my students who come in saying they are being bullied indicate that it has not happened more than once, that they are friends with the person and choose to be around him/her, that they do not believe the person has more power, and that no, they do not believe they are being bullied based on the definition given. In those cases, I take the opportunity to do some psycho-education on true bullying and remind them of the bullying vs. meanness lessons I presented to their class. Then, we work together to develop solutions to the conflict, and I teach some resolution and communication skills.

If a student marks off multiple indicators of bullying, I remind them that I have to tell another adult if someone is in danger (such as someone being bullied). At the bottom of the form is the following statement: “I have been honest in answering this form. I understand that in a true bullying situation, the school counselor cannot keep private what I have told her, and she will likely bring this to the attention of the principal and assistant principal.” The student then signs the form, and I bring the situation to my principal and assistant principal as part of our school bullying protocol.

Overall, this form has helped me further educate students on what is and is not bullying, while giving me a tool to better assess for a bullying situation. Visit my TPT store to download my Student Bullying Report Form for FREE.

Laura Smestad, M.A., LPC, NCC is an elementary and middle school counselor in New Orleans, LA. She is the creator of The School Counselor Life Blog, which is designed as a resource to other school counselors looking for individual and small group counseling ideas, classroom lessons, organization tips and all things school counseling.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates and newsletters.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.  Additionally, I do giveaways through My Facebook Page with my new products.  Be sure to like Savvy School Counselor on Facebook and click to receive notifications so you don’t miss them!


Online Counseling Programs Article

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OCP

I recently wrote an article for Online Counseling Programs.  The title is 5 Strategies for a Successful School Counseling Internship.  Please check it out and share it with the school counselor interns in your life.

I’m excited to welcome a new school counselor intern to work with me this fall.  My intern from last year just got her first school counseling job in my school district and another former intern is now a part time counselor at my school this year.  After doing everything solo for the last 12 years, I am super excited to have a partner to work with.

Today, I am back at work and ready to begin a new and exciting school year.  Once I get used to the early hours everyday again, I’ll be just fine. :o)

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates and newsletters.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.  Additionally, I do giveaways through My Facebook Page with my new products.  Be sure to like Savvy School Counselor on Facebook and click to receive notifications so you don’t miss them!

TpT Bonus Sale


Be Wall – Collage Frame

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BeCollageI few years ago, I put a Be Wall display on a wall outside my school counseling office.  As paper taped to a wall usually does, the ends began to curl.  I went behind each piece with hot glue.  It looked okay for just a little while longer, but it is time to retire it.  I wrote about my display in a School Counseling Office Updates post.  The idea originated from the Entirely Elementary…School Counseling blog, and Susan Fuller generously provided links to all of the words and signs for her followers.  I really love the idea, so this time I decided to create for a 4×6 collage picture frame to go in my office.  With the frame, the ends won’t curl up and should only need a little dusting from time to time.  I’m really happy with how it turned out, and I can’t wait to hang it in my office this week when I return to work on Friday.

I purchased the 20×48 frame from Walmart.  It was $19.98 and displays twenty-one 4×6 photos.  I created word cards with 20 of the words.  I used the sheets with the generic photos that come with the frame to position and glue my word cards on, put them back in and my new Be Wall  Be Collage Frame was complete.

Be Collage Frame

Be Collage Frame - Full

Click the following link to download the words I made for my collage frame:  Be Collage Frame Word Cards

You can use the words in any frames that hold 4×6 pictures.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates and newsletters.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.  Additionally, I do giveaways through My Facebook Page with my new products.  Be sure to like Savvy School Counselor on Facebook and click to receive notifications so you don’t miss them!


It’s Almost Back to School Time!

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In just three more weeks, I will be back at my school preparing to see my students and starting a brand new school year.  Regardless of how much I love my summer break (and I mean LOVE…), there is something exciting about starting over with a fresh, clean slate!  It’s time to start thinking about setting up my office and planning for the school year.  Here are a few things I want to share again to get you thinking about ideas to incorporate at your school.

A few years ago, I shared how I made this Crafty Character Trait Collage.  If you’re like me and enjoy being “crafty” from time to time, this is a fun project to take on.  It’s just a matter of finding stickers and letters that appeal to you, scrapbook paper and a little time.  Check out this post if you’d like more information on how to create one yourself.  Walmart continues to sell these exact same frames in black and brown.

CharacterCollage

I plan to continue my College and Career Spotlight bulletin board this school year.  As I shared in January, half of the board highlights colleges and universities and half spotlights an individual career cluster.  Although I didn’t get through many schools during the last school year, the staff at my school was very helpful with supplying school paraphernalia for their Alma Maters. I’m looking forward to spotlighting more this year.

careerboard

I have really loved using the book Mrs. Joyce Gives the Best High Fives with my students.  This book helps facilitate everything you’ll want to touch on during your meet the counselor lessons or new student groups.

Book Cover

Finally, for anyone looking to add to your school counseling resources, starting at midnight tonight, the annual site-wide TpT Back to School Sale will be underway.  The sale will run through Tuesday, August 2nd.  During those two days, you can save 28% on all the resources in my TpT store.  All you need to do is use the Promo Code:  BestYear for the complete discount.

August 16 Sale

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates and newsletters.


Image -Based Life Lessons

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Image-Based Life LessonsI recently added another Youthlight school counseling resource to my collection called Image-Based Life Lessons by Eric Cooper.  This book is designed for Kindergarten through 6th grade and comes with a CD which has 50 PowerPoint presentations.  There are eight topics covered and each has anywhere from four to eight lessons.

Each section’s PowerPoints can be opened as one presentation with all of the lessons, or you may chose to open each lesson’s PowerPoint individually.  Lesson’s were created to last about 5-10 minutes, so they may be incorporated with what you are already doing or combined to created a 30 minute lesson.  Scripts and review questions are included for each presentation and can be printed from the CD.

The topics include:

Section 1:  Attitude, Thoughts and Feelings (8 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Grow Your Smarts – Abilities can grow with hard work and practice.

Grow Your Smarts

Section 2:  Friendship (8 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Open or Closed? – If you’re picky or stubborn, you can push friends away.

Open or Closed

Section 3:  Peer Pressure (5 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Ten Ways to Say “No” – Ten great options are provided to help kids who have a difficult time saying no.

Ten Ways to Say No

Section 4:  Bullying (7 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Don’t Cross the Line – This lesson helps students understand two types of teasing.

Don't Cross the Line

Section 5:  Self-Concept (4 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Nobody is 100% Normal – Students learn to accept and embrace the things that make them different.

Nobody is 100 Percent Normal

Section 6:  Hard Work and Career (8 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Plan B – Students with big dreams can think about their plan B…just in case they don’t all work out.

Plan B

Section 7:  Anger and Self-Control (6 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Feeling Angry? – This lesson provides anger management strategies.

Feeling Angry

Section 8:  Problem Solving (4 lessons)

My Favorite Lesson:  Coping Skills – Students learn how to deal with the “unsolvable” problems.

Coping Skills

After taking the time to go through the presentations, I’m able to think about where I could fit them into my school counseling program.  Most of the lessons in the first section, for example, tie in perfectly with Growth Mindset.

Not only can these lessons be used in the classroom, they can be incorporated into small groups and individual sessions.  I believe I will get plenty of use out of this resource with my student self-referrals.

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.  Additionally, I do giveaways through My Facebook Page with my new products.  Be sure to like Savvy School Counselor on Facebook and click to receive notifications so you don’t miss them!

June 2016 Sale

This sale ends tonight at midnight! Everything, including my already discounted bundles, are 20% off.


Targeting Students At-Risk for Substance Abuse

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My thanks to Tim Wayne for sharing the following information and infographic for school counselors created for Bradley University’s online counseling program:

Unexplained absences, dipping academic performance, changing peer groups, and a whole range of physical symptoms: all of these signs can be telling when substance abuse is impacting the life of a student. Substance abuse continues to become a problem for thousands of students each day, with well over half of new users being younger than 18-years old.

As inevitable as drug use may seem among young people, school counselors are in a unique position to make a difference in their community. School counselors can play an important role in heading drug-prevention policies, offering effective prevention messaging, and providing support for students who are most vulnerable to the dangers of addiction.

While a drug-free environment requires an entire community of support, school counselors can play a unique role in recruiting parents, local law enforcement, and youth agencies to create a supportive community to help students resist substance abuse.

Learn more about the statistics of youth drug use, warning signs of substance abuse, and prevention strategies that you can take to make a difference in students’ lives in the infographic below.


Created for the Online Counseling Program at Bradley University

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Thank you, Tim, for sharing this with my readers.  It is great information to refer to as we prepare for the upcoming school year.  Red Ribbon Week will be here before we know it!

Stick around!  You can follow Savvy School Counselor with free email updates.  You can also follow my TpT Store to keep up with my latest products and freebies.  Additionally, I do giveaways through My Facebook Page with my new products.  Be sure to like Savvy School Counselor on Facebook and click to receive notifications so you don’t miss them!  (There’s another one going on right now by the way!  It ends at 5:00 EST this evening.)